MPs receive £2,200 pay rise on SAME DAY Britons hit with skyrocketing energy price costs

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Energy price cap: Government ‘need to do more’ says Massara

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There has been mounting anger at the soaring cost of living crisis, with energy costs and inflation hitting the pockets of hard-working people up and down the country. Chancellor Rishi Sunak and the Government have faced accusations of being out of touch after failing to provide more support for struggling households.

Fuel has been added to the fire after today’s increase in the energy price cap coincided with the day MPs received a more than £2,000 pay rise.

John O’Connell, chief executive of the TaxPayers’ Alliance, told Express.co.uk: “Parliamentary pay rises are a slap in the face for taxpayers facing spiralling bills.

“Rows over unpopular and unseemly increases are inevitable when politicians’ salaries are pegged to public sector pay.

“Elected officials must push to keep costs down for constituents and should only accept pay rises when economic conditions allow.”

READ MORE: Energy warning: Bills set to increase by ‘another £800’, ex-CEO warns

There has been outrage bills are increasing on the same day MPs get a pay rise

There has been outrage bills are increasing on the same day MPs get a pay rise (Image: GETTY)

Millions of people face being hit with an unprecedented £700-a-year rise in energy costs.

A rise in the energy price cap that came into place from midnight means a household using a typical amount of gas and electricity will now pay £1,971 per year.

Mr Sunak last month announced plans to help households with a £350 per household rebate package, although critics say it is nowhere near enough to mitigate for the rising costs.

Organisations such as the TaxPayers’ Alliance have been calling on ministers to scrap the green levy imposed on energy bills by the Government to help keep costs manageable.

The new, higher energy price cap has come into force on the same day MPs have received a £2,200 pay rise.

The Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (IPSA), which sets the pay of MPs, said it was increasing the parliamentarians’ pay by 2.7 percent from £81,932 to £84,144 because of a “dramatically increased” workload over the past year.

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Rishi Sunak faild to introduce more help ahead of the price cap rise

Rishi Sunak faild to introduce more help ahead of the price cap rise (Image: PA)

Boris Johnson is set to accept the pay rise

Boris Johnson is set to accept the pay rise (Image: PA)

Richard Lloyd, IPSA’s Chair, said: “MPs play a vital role in our democracy and this is reflected in their pay.

“It is right that MPs are paid fairly for the responsibility and the unseen work they do helping their constituents, which dramatically increased last year.”

In January The Prime Minister urged IPSA to show “restraint” in setting the pay for MPs, hinted salaries should remain as they were.

However, No10 has suggested Boris Johnson intends to take the increased wage.

MPs' pay will increase by 2.7 percent from £81,932 to £84,144

MPs’ pay will increase by 2.7 percent from £81,932 to £84,144 (Image: PA)

MPs cannot reject the pay rise but previous Prime Ministers have often donated the extra cash to charity.

This morning, policing minister Kit Malthouse admitted the cost of living crisis meant the months ahead will be “very tough” for families.

He said: “We completely acknowledge that a combination of factors has meant that prices are rising significantly, energy prices in particular, driven by a variety of factors – post-pandemic, the war in Ukraine, other kinds of global factors outside of our immediate control – and it is tough.

“For those of us who have a smart meter, as we do here in my house, we can see how much it is costing us on an hourly basis, and it is not happy reading.”

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